How do Swiss medical schools prepare their students to become good communicators in their future professional careers: a questionnaire and interview study involving medical graduates, teachers and curriculum coordinators.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_0B0C4DF69B57
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
How do Swiss medical schools prepare their students to become good communicators in their future professional careers: a questionnaire and interview study involving medical graduates, teachers and curriculum coordinators.
Journal
BMC medical education
Author(s)
Junod Perron N., Klöckner Cronauer C., Hautz S.C., Schnabel K.P., Breckwoldt J., Monti M., Huwendiek S., Feller S.
ISSN
1472-6920 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1472-6920
Publication state
Published
Issued date
29/11/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
18
Number
1
Pages
285
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Since 2011, the Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives (SCLO) has provided the framework for assessing communication skills in the Swiss Medical Federal Licensing Examination (FLE). This study evaluates how far the communication curricula of five Swiss medical schools match the SCLO and international recommendations. It also explores their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT).
A mixed method approach was used. In a first step, curriculum coordinators/key communication skills teachers and medical graduates were asked to fill out a questionnaire based on communication related objectives from the SCLO and a review of European consensus statements on communication training. Second, information was collected from all Swiss medical schools to identify which communication skills were taught in which formats and at what time points within the 6-year curricula. Finally, 3-4 curriculum coordinators/key communication skills teachers from each medical school were interviewed about their communication curriculum, using SWOT analysis.
Sixteen teachers/coordinators (response rate 100%) and 389 medical graduates (response rate 43%) filled out the questionnaire. Both the teachers/coordinators and the graduates considered that two thirds of the communication items listed in the questionnaire were covered in their curricula. Between sixty and two hundred structured hours were dedicated to communication, predominantly in small group and experiential formats. Assessment relied on both MCQs and OSCEs. Most of the training occurred during the first three years of medical school. Teachers felt that the need for communication skills training was now well-recognized by their institution and was taught with appropriate teaching methods. However, recruitment and training of teachers, continuity of communication skills training during clinical years, and the adoption of a common frame of reference among the five medical schools, remained a challenge.
Although the Swiss medical schools all offered a partly longitudinal communication skills training, with appropriate teaching methods, this study indicates that the communication skills actually taught do not fully match the SCLO or international recommendations. There was less training for complex communication skills training during the clinical years, and ensuring quality and coherence in the teaching remained a challenge.
Keywords
Clinical Competence, Communication, Curriculum/standards, Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Educational Measurement, Educational Personnel, Health Services Research, Humans, Professionalism/standards, Schools, Medical/organization & administration, Schools, Medical/standards, Students, Medical, Surveys and Questionnaires, Switzerland, Curriculum, Medical students, Swiss, Training
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/12/2018 17:33
Last modification date
26/11/2020 7:24
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