Excess winter deaths caused by cardiovascular diseases are associated with both mild winter temperature and socio-economic inequalities in the U.S.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0A19AB81EEC6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Excess winter deaths caused by cardiovascular diseases are associated with both mild winter temperature and socio-economic inequalities in the U.S.
Journal
International Journal of Cardiology
Author(s)
Gonseth S., Nusslé S., Bovet P., Panese F., Wiemels J.L.
ISSN
1874-1754 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0167-5273
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
187
Pages
642-644
Language
english
Notes
Document Type: Letter
Abstract
Mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) exhibits seasonal variation. For example, 30% more deaths occurred in winter compared to summer in a multicountry study [1]. The effect of cold temperature on several CVD risk factors and on seasonal influenza infection may partially underlie this seasonal variation [2] and [3]. However an unexplained paradox has been observed: seasonality in CVD mortality is larger in temperate mid-latitude countries (e.g. Portugal) than in colder northern countries (e.g. Scandinavian countries) [1]. This paradox has also been previously observed in Europe for overall mortality, and it may relate to uneven proportions between countries of people who are unable to adequately protect themselves against cold due to low socio-economic status (SES), e.g. inadequate clothing, housing insulation and heating systems [4] and [5]. We hypothesized that the seasonal variability in CVD mortality is larger in low socio-economic U.S. states experiencing mild winters compared to high socio-economic states experiencing cold winters.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
20/06/2015 8:25
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:32
Usage data