Antibodies to combat viral infections: development strategies and progress.

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State: Public
Version: author
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_09F440C68729
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Antibodies to combat viral infections: development strategies and progress.
Journal
Nature reviews. Drug discovery
Author(s)
Pantaleo G., Correia B., Fenwick C., Joo V.S., Perez L.
ISSN
1474-1784 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1474-1776
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
21
Number
9
Pages
676-696
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are appealing as potential therapeutics and prophylactics for viral infections owing to characteristics such as their high specificity and their ability to enhance immune responses. Furthermore, antibody engineering can be used to strengthen effector function and prolong mAb half-life, and advances in structural biology have enabled the selection and optimization of potent neutralizing mAbs through identification of vulnerable regions in viral proteins, which can also be relevant for vaccine design. The COVID-19 pandemic has stimulated extensive efforts to develop neutralizing mAbs against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), with several mAbs now having received authorization for emergency use, providing not just an important component of strategies to combat COVID-19 but also a boost to efforts to harness mAbs in therapeutic and preventive settings for other infectious diseases. Here, we describe advances in antibody discovery and engineering that have led to the development of mAbs for use against infections caused by viruses including SARS-CoV-2, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Ebola virus (EBOV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and influenza. We also discuss the rationale for moving from empirical to structure-guided strategies in vaccine development, based on identifying optimal candidate antigens and vulnerable regions within them that can be targeted by antibodies to result in a strong protective immune response.
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use, Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use, Antibodies, Viral, COVID-19, Humans, Pandemics/prevention & control, SARS-CoV-2, Virus Diseases/prevention & control
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/06/2022 12:39
Last modification date
21/11/2022 8:12
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