Pregnancy Outcome Following Maternal Exposure To Statins: A Multicenter Prospective Study

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_097345A56E49
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Pregnancy Outcome Following Maternal Exposure To Statins: A Multicenter Prospective Study
Title of the conference
10th Congress of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Author(s)
Winterfeld U., Panchaud A., Merlob P., Rothuizen L., Cuppers-Maarschalkerweerd B., Vial T., Stephens S., Clementi M., De Santis M., Pistelli A., Berlin M., Elefteriou Z. M., Manakova E., Buclin T.
Address
Budapest, Hungary, 26-29 June 2011
ISBN
1742-7835
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
109
Series
Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology
Pages
142
Language
english
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Abstract
Introduction: Statin use for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia in women of childbearing age is increasingly common. However, published data on pregnancy outcome after exposure to statins are scarce and conflicting. This contribution addresses the safety of exposure to statins during pregnancy.Method: In a multi-center (n = 11) observational, prospective study we compared the outcomes of 249 women exposed during the 1st trimester of pregnancy to simvastatin (n = 124), atorvastatin (n = 67), pravastatin (n = 32), rosuvastatin (n = 18), fluvastatin (n = 7) or cerivastatin (n = 1) with a control group exposed to agents known to be non-teratogenic (n = 249). The data were collected by members of the European Network of Teratology Information Services (ENTIS) during individual risk counseling between 1990 and 2009. Standardized procedures for data collection were used in each center.Results: The difference in the rate of major birth defects between the statin-exposed group and the control group was not statistically significant (4.0% vs. 2.7% OR 1.5; 95% CI 0.5-4.5, P = 0.44). The crude rate of spontaneous abortions (12.8% vs. 7.1%, OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.6, P = 0.04) was higher in the exposed group. However, after adjustment to maternal age and gestational age at initial contact, the difference became statistically insignificant. The rate of elective pregnancy-termination (8.8% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.05) was higher and the rate of deliveries resulting in live births was significantly lower in the statin exposed group (77.9% vs. 88.4%, P = 0.002). Prematurity was more frequent in exposed pregnancies (16.1% vs. 8.5%; OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-3.8, P = 0.02). Nonetheless, gestational age at birth (median 39 weeks, IQR 37-40 vs. 39 weeks, IQR 38-40, P = 0.27) and birth weight (median 3280 g, IQR 2835-3590 vs. 3250 g, IQR 2880-3600, P = 0.95) did not differ between exposed and non-exposed pregnancies.Conclusion: This study did not detect a clear teratogenic effect of statins. Its statistical power however is not sufficient to reverse the recommendation of treatment discontinuation during pregnancy. At most, the results are reassuring in case of inadvertent exposure.
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Create date
15/07/2011 10:29
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:31
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