Automated seizure detection using wearable devices: A clinical practice guideline of the International League Against Epilepsy and the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_08F3B7BE2BAA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Automated seizure detection using wearable devices: A clinical practice guideline of the International League Against Epilepsy and the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.
Journal
Clinical neurophysiology
Author(s)
Beniczky S., Wiebe S., Jeppesen J., Tatum W.O., Brazdil M., Wang Y., Herman S.T., Ryvlin P.
ISSN
1872-8952 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1388-2457
Publication state
Published
Issued date
05/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
132
Number
5
Pages
1173-1184
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The objective of this clinical practice guideline (CPG) is to provide recommendations for healthcare personnel working with patients with epilepsy, on the use of wearable devices for automated seizure detection in patients with epilepsy, in outpatient, ambulatory settings. The Working Group of the International League Against Epilepsy and the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology developed the CPG according to the methodology proposed by the ILAE Epilepsy Guidelines Working Group. We reviewed the published evidence using The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement and evaluated the evidence and formulated the recommendations following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. We found high level of evidence for the accuracy of automated detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and focal-to-bilateral tonic-clonic seizures (FBTCS) and recommend use of wearable automated seizure detection devices for selected patients when accurate detection of GTCS and FBTCS is recommended as a clinical adjunct. We also found moderate level of evidence for seizure types without GTCs or FBTCs. However, it was uncertain whether the detected alarms resulted in meaningful clinical outcomes for the patients. We recommend using clinically validated devices for automated detection of GTCS and FBTCS, especially in unsupervised patients, where alarms can result in rapid intervention (weak/conditional recommendation). At present, we do not recommend clinical use of the currently available devices for other seizure types (weak/conditional recommendation). Further research and development are needed to improve the performance of automated seizure detection and to document their accuracy and clinical utility.
Keywords
Algorithms, Automated detection, Epilepsy, Seizure detection, Wearable devices
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
16/03/2021 9:29
Last modification date
12/06/2021 6:34
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