Brain responses to success and failure: Direct recordings from human cerebral cortex

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_07C7562F00CC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Brain responses to success and failure: Direct recordings from human cerebral cortex
Journal
Hum Brain Mapp
Author(s)
Jung J., Jerbi K., Ossandon T., Ryvlin P., Isnard J., Bertrand O., Guenot M., Mauguiere F., Lachaux J. P.
ISSN
1097-0193 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1065-9471
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2010
Volume
31
Number
8
Pages
1217-32
Language
english
Notes
Jung, Julien
Jerbi, Karim
Ossandon, Tomas
Ryvlin, Philippe
Isnard, Jean
Bertrand, Olivier
Guenot, Marc
Mauguiere, Francois
Lachaux, Jean-Philippe
eng
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Hum Brain Mapp. 2010 Aug;31(8):1217-32. doi: 10.1002/hbm.20930.
Abstract
Evaluating the outcome of our own actions is a fundamental process by which we adapt our behavior in our interaction with the external world. fMRI and electrophysiological studies in monkeys have found feedback-specific responses in several brain regions, unveiling facets of a large-scale network predominantly distributed in the frontal lobes. However, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding the exact contribution of each region. The present study benefited from intracerebral EEG recordings in epileptic patients to record directly the neural activity in each of those frontal structures in response to positive and negative feedback. Both types of feedback induced a sequence of high-frequency responses (>40 Hz) in a widespread network involving medial frontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and insular cortex. The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), DLPFC, and lateral OFC showed higher activation in response to negative feedback, while medial OFC and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) were more responsive to positive feedback. Responses in the medial prefrontal cortex (pre-SMA and dACC) were sustained (lasting more than 1,000 ms), while responses in the DLPFC, insula, and the OFC were short lasting (less than 800 ms). Taken together, our findings show that evaluating the outcome of our actions triggers gamma-range activity modulations in several frontal and insular regions. Moreover, we found that the timing and amplitude of those gamma-band responses reveal fine-scale dissociations between the neural dynamics of positive versus negative feedback processing.
Keywords
Adult, *Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex/pathology/*physiopathology, Electrodes, Implanted, Electroencephalography/methods, Epilepsies, Partial/*pathology, Evoked Potentials, Visual/*physiology, Feedback, Physiological/*physiology, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Photic Stimulation/methods, Time Perception/*physiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Create date
29/11/2018 12:36
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:30
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