Food availability affects the maternal transfer of androgens and antibodies into eggs of a colonial seabird.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_04C007F4E76B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Food availability affects the maternal transfer of androgens and antibodies into eggs of a colonial seabird.
Journal
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Author(s)
Gasparini J., Boulinier T., Gill V.A., Gil D., Hatch S.A., Roulin A.
ISSN
1010-061X[print], 1010-061X[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
3
Pages
874-880
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Mothers can improve the quality of their offspring by increasing the level of certain components in their eggs. To examine whether or not mothers increase deposition of such components in eggs as a function of food availability, we food-supplemented black-legged kittiwake females (Rissa tridactyla) before and during egg laying and compared deposition of androgens and antibodies into eggs of first and experimentally induced replacement clutches. Food-supplemented females transferred lower amounts of androgens and antibodies into eggs of induced replacement clutches than did non-food-supplemented mothers, whereas first clutches presented no differences between treatments. Our results suggest that when females are in lower condition, they transfer more androgens and antibodies into eggs to facilitate chick development despite potential long-term costs for juveniles. Females in prime condition may avoid these potential long-term costs because they can provide their chicks with more and higher quality resources.
Keywords
Androgens/metabolism, Animals, Antibodies/metabolism, Charadriiformes/metabolism, Charadriiformes/physiology, Clutch Size, Feeding Behavior, Female, Maternal Behavior, Nesting Behavior, Ovum/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/01/2008 18:43
Last modification date
26/09/2019 7:08
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