High fat versus high carbohydrate nutritional supplementation: a one year trial in stunted rural Gambian children.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0299D13DB6AC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
High fat versus high carbohydrate nutritional supplementation: a one year trial in stunted rural Gambian children.
Journal
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Author(s)
Krähenbühl J.D., Schutz Y., Jéquier E.
ISSN
0954-3007 (Print)
ISSN-L
0954-3007
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/1998
Volume
52
Number
3
Pages
213-222
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Clinical Trial ; Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study tests the hypothesis that a low daily fat intake may induce a negative fat balance and impair catch-up growth in stunted children between 3 and 9y of age.
DESIGN: Randomized case-control study.
SETTING: Three rural villages of the West Kiang District, The Gambia.
SUBJECTS: Three groups of 30 stunted but not wasted children (height for age z-score < or = -2.0, weight for height z-score > or = -2.0) 3-9 y of age were selected by anthropometric survey. Groups were matched for age, sex, village, degree of stunting and season.
INTERVENTION: Two groups were randomly assigned to be supplemented five days a week for one year with either a high fat (n = 29) or a high carbohydrate biscuit (n = 30) each containing approximately 1600 kJ. The third group was a non supplemented control group (n = 29). Growth, nutritional status, dietary intake, resting energy expenditure and morbidity were compared.
RESULTS: Neither the high fat nor the high carbohydrate supplement had an effect on weight or height gain. The high fat supplement did slightly increase adipose tissue mass. There was no effect of supplementation on resting energy expenditure or morbidity. In addition, the annual growth rate was not associated with a morbidity score.
CONCLUSIONS: Results show that neither a high fat nor a high carbohydrate supplement given during 12 months to stunted Gambian children induced catch-up growth. The authors suggest that an adverse effect of the environment on catch-up growth persists despite the nutritional interventions.
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, Body Composition, Body Height, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Dietary Carbohydrates/administration & dosage, Dietary Fats/administration & dosage, Energy Intake, Energy Metabolism, Female, Gambia, Growth Disorders/diet therapy, Humans, Male, Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Weight Gain
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
21/01/2008 13:07
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:24
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