Rapid Sequence Induction With a Standard Intubation Dose of Rocuronium After Magnesium Pretreatment Compared With Succinylcholine: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_027F3C311045
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Rapid Sequence Induction With a Standard Intubation Dose of Rocuronium After Magnesium Pretreatment Compared With Succinylcholine: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
Journal
Anesthesia and analgesia
Author(s)
Czarnetzki C., Albrecht E., Masouyé P., Baeriswyl M., Poncet A., Robin M., Kern C., Tramèr M.R.
ISSN
1526-7598 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0003-2999
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Succinylcholine remains the muscle relaxant of choice for rapid sequence induction (RSI) but has many adverse effects. High-dose rocuronium bromide may be an alternative to succinylcholine for RSI but recovery times are nearly doubled compared with a standard intubating dose of rocuronium. Magnesium sulfate significantly shortens the onset time of a standard intubating dose of rocuronium. We set out to investigate whether intravenous (IV) pretreatment with MgSO4 followed by a standard intubating dose of rocuronium achieved superior intubation conditions compared with succinylcholine.
Adults were randomized to receive a 15-minute IV infusion of MgSO4 (60 mg·kg-1) immediately before RSI with propofol 2 mg·kg-1, sufentanil 0.2 μg·kg-1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg·kg-1, or a matching 15-minute IV infusion of saline immediately before an identical RSI, but with succinylcholine 1 mg·kg-1. Primary end point was the rate of excellent intubating conditions 60 seconds after administration of the neuromuscular blocking agent and compared between groups using multivariable log-binomial regression model. Secondary end points were blood pressure and heart rate before induction, before and after intubation, and adverse events up to 24 hours postoperatively.
Among 280 randomized patients, intubating conditions could be analyzed in 259 (133 MgSO4-rocuronium and 126 saline-succinylcholine). The rate of excellent intubating conditions was 46% with MgSO4-rocuronium and 45% with saline-succinylcholine. The analysis adjusted for gender and center showed no superiority of MgSO4-rocuronium compared with saline-succinylcholine (relative risk [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-1.39, P = .659). The rate of excellent intubating conditions was higher in women (54% [70 of 130]) compared with men (37% [48 of 129]; adjusted RR 1.42, 95% CI, 1.07-1.91, P = .017). No significant difference between groups was observed for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Mean heart rate was significantly higher in the MgSO4-rocuronium group. The percentage of patients with at least 1 adverse event was lower with MgSO4-rocuronium (11%) compared with saline-succinylcholine (28%) (RR 0.38, 95% CI, 0.22-0.66, P < .001). With saline-succinylcholine, adverse events consisted mainly of postoperative muscle pain (n = 26 [19%]) and signs of histamine release (n = 13 [9%]). With MgSO4-rocuronium, few patients had pain on injection, nausea and vomiting, or skin rash during the MgSO4-infusion (n = 5 [4%]).
IV pretreatment with MgSO4 followed by a standard intubating dose of rocuronium did not provide superior intubation conditions to succinylcholine but had fewer adverse effects.
Pubmed
Create date
29/12/2020 15:24
Last modification date
05/01/2021 7:26
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