Long-term outcome after cognitive and behavioral regression in nonlesional epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0186AD0A2D27
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Long-term outcome after cognitive and behavioral regression in nonlesional epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep.
Journal
Epilepsia
Author(s)
Seegmüller C., Deonna T., Dubois C.M., Valenti-Hirsch M.P., Hirsch E., Metz-Lutz M.N., de Saint Martin A., Roulet-Perez E.
ISSN
1528-1167 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0013-9580
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
53
Number
6
Pages
1067-1076
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
PURPOSE: To present the long-term follow-up of 10 adolescents and young adults with documented cognitive and behavioral regression as children due to nonlesional focal, mainly frontal, epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow wave sleep (CSWS).
METHODS: Past medical and electroencephalography (EEG) data were reviewed and neuropsychological tests exploring main cognitive functions were administered.
KEY FINDINGS: After a mean duration of follow-up of 15.6 years (range, 8-23 years), none of the 10 patients had recovered fully, but four regained borderline to normal intelligence and were almost independent. Patients with prolonged global intellectual regression had the worst outcome, whereas those with more specific and short-lived deficits recovered best. The marked behavioral disorders resolved in all but one patient. Executive functions were neither severely nor homogenously affected. Three patients with a frontal syndrome during the active phase (AP) disclosed only mild residual executive and social cognition deficits. The main cognitive gains occurred shortly after the AP, but qualitative improvements continued to occur. Long-term outcome correlated best with duration of CSWS.
SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings emphasize that cognitive recovery after cessation of CSWS depends on the severity and duration of the initial regression. None of our patients had major executive and social cognition deficits with preserved intelligence, as reported in adults with early destructive lesions of the frontal lobes. Early recognition of epilepsy with CSWS and rapid introduction of effective therapy are crucial for a best possible outcome.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age of Onset, Behavioral Symptoms/diagnosis, Behavioral Symptoms/etiology, Cognition Disorders/diagnosis, Cognition Disorders/etiology, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy/complications, Epilepsy/psychology, Female, Humans, Intelligence, Learning Disorders/diagnosis, Learning Disorders/etiology, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Personality, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Retrospective Studies, Sleep/physiology, Social Behavior, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/07/2012 18:08
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:23
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