Associations of short-term particle and noise exposures with markers of cardiovascular and respiratory health among highway maintenance workers

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State: Serval
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_0137759B24E5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Associations of short-term particle and noise exposures with markers of cardiovascular and respiratory health among highway maintenance workers
Journal
Environmental Health Perspectives
Author(s)
Meier Reto, Cascio Wayne E., Ghio Andrew J., Wild Pascal, Danuser Brigitta, Riediker Michael
ISSN
1552-9924 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0091-6765
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
122
Number
7
Pages
726-732
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Highway maintenance workers are constantly and simultaneously exposed to traffic-related particle and noise emissions, and both have been linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in population-based epidemiology studies.
OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate short-term health effects related to particle and noise exposure.
METHODS: We monitored 18 maintenance workers, during as many as five 24-hour periods from a total of 50 observation days. We measured their exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), ultrafine particles, noise, and the cardiopulmonary health endpoints: blood pressure, pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic markers in the blood, lung function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured approximately 15 hours post-work. Heart rate variability was assessed during a sleep period approximately 10 hours post-work.
RESULTS: PM2.5 exposure was significantly associated with C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, and negatively associated with tumor necrosis factor α. None of the particle metrics were significantly associated with von Willebrand factor or tissue factor expression. PM2.5 and work noise were associated with markers of increased heart rate variability, and with increased HF and LF power. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure on the following morning were significantly associated with noise exposure after work, and non-significantly associated with PM2.5. We observed no significant associations between any of the exposures and lung function or FeNO.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that exposure to particles and noise during highway maintenance work might pose a cardiovascular health risk. Actions to reduce these exposures could lead to better health for this population of workers.
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational , Vehicle Emissions , Noise , Occupational Exposure ,
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
03/04/2014 16:26
Last modification date
03/03/2018 13:14
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