Sexual conflict drives male manipulation of female postmating responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_0116569E2A2C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sexual conflict drives male manipulation of female postmating responses in Drosophila melanogaster.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Hollis B., Koppik M., Wensing K.U., Ruhmann H., Genzoni E., Erkosar B., Kawecki T.J., Fricke C., Keller L.
ISSN
1091-6490 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8424
Publication state
Published
Issued date
23/04/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
116
Number
17
Pages
8437-8444
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In many animals, females respond to mating with changes in physiology and behavior that are triggered by molecules transferred by males during mating. In Drosophila melanogaster, proteins in the seminal fluid are responsible for important female postmating responses, including temporal changes in egg production, elevated feeding rates and activity levels, reduced sexual receptivity, and activation of the immune system. It is unclear to what extent these changes are mutually beneficial to females and males or instead represent male manipulation. Here we use an experimental evolution approach in which females are randomly paired with a single male each generation, eliminating any opportunity for competition for mates or mate choice and thereby aligning the evolutionary interests of the sexes. After >150 generations of evolution, males from monogamous populations elicited a weaker postmating stimulation of egg production and activity than males from control populations that evolved with a polygamous mating system. Males from monogamous populations did not differ from males from polygamous populations in their ability to induce refractoriness to remating in females, but they were inferior to polygamous males in sperm competition. Mating-responsive genes in both the female abdomen and head showed a dampened response to mating with males from monogamous populations. Males from monogamous populations also exhibited lower expression of genes encoding seminal fluid proteins, which mediate the female response to mating. Together, these results demonstrate that the female postmating response, and the male molecules involved in eliciting this response, are shaped by ongoing sexual conflict.
Keywords
Animals, Biological Evolution, Drosophila Proteins/analysis, Drosophila Proteins/genetics, Drosophila Proteins/metabolism, Drosophila melanogaster/genetics, Drosophila melanogaster/metabolism, Drosophila melanogaster/physiology, Female, Male, Seminal Plasma Proteins/analysis, Seminal Plasma Proteins/genetics, Seminal Plasma Proteins/metabolism, Sexual Behavior, Animal/physiology, Transcriptome/genetics, Transcriptome/physiology, Drosophila melanogaster, experimental evolution, seminal fluid proteins, sexual conflict, sexual selection
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
15/04/2019 18:09
Last modification date
05/04/2020 6:20
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