Does believing in "use it or lose it" relate to self-rated memory control, strategy use, and recall?

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_00954F16D27B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Does believing in "use it or lose it" relate to self-rated memory control, strategy use, and recall?
Journal
International Journal on Aging and Human Development
Author(s)
Hertzog C., McGuire C. L., Horhota M., Jopp D. S.
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Number
1
Pages
61-87
Language
english
Notes
Hertzog, Christopher McGuire, Christy L Horhota, Michelle Jopp, Daniela R37 AG013148/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States R37 AG013148-05/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States R37 AG013148-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States R37 AG013148-13/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States R37-AG13148/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States Comparative Study Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural United States Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2010;70(1):61-87.
Abstract
After an oral free recall task, participants were interviewed about their memory. Despite reporting similar levels of perceived personal control over memory, older and young adults differed in the means in which they believed memory could be controlled. Older adults cited health and wellness practices and exercising memory, consistent with a "use it or lose it" belief system, more often than young adults who were more likely to mention metacognition and flexible strategy use as means of memory control. Young adults reported using more effective relational strategies during study for a free recall test. Use of relational strategies predicted recall in both age groups, but did not materially affect age differences in performance. Metacognitive beliefs, including implicit theories about aging and memory decline, memory self-concept, and perceived control over memory functioning, did not systematically correlate with strategy use or recall.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging/ psychology, Attitude, Cognition, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Memory, Memory Disorders/ psychology, Mental Recall, Middle Aged, Self Concept, Young Adult
Create date
23/10/2014 9:32
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:22
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